Wednesday, February 13, 2013

The Temple House at Horton

A garden front view of The Temple House, Horton.
Image:  Jackson-Stops & Staff.
Devoted Readers will recall the posts about the once-derelict folly known as The Menagerie that was expanded to become a house and presented by The Devoted Classicist in three parts here, here, and here.  Thanks to a notice sent by Andrew Triggs, author of the highly-recommended blog British and Irish Stately Homes, it was learned that another surviving outbuilding at Horton, The Temple House, was for sale.  Well, the majority of the parkland folly, a Listed Grade II house, is available for a price of GBP 875,000.  (See update at end of this essay).

Floor plans of The Temple House, Horton.
(The portico is not indicated)
Image:  Jackson-Stops & Staff.
Thought to date from the 1750s as a stone folly, The Temple was renovated and extended with a brick addition in the latter part of the 19th century.  The property was divided into two dwellings in 1990, according to the real estate agents, Jackson-Stops & Staff, Northampton, with The Temple House being to the south and Temple Court (also known as Temple Cottage) to the north.

A map of The Temple House, Horton, property.
Image:  Jackson-Stops & Staff.
With a garden of about 1.4 acres, the entrance faces the road while the principal front with the portico faces the park.  Entering a vestibule, there is a Powder Room as we would describe it in the U.S.

The Dining Hall at The Temple House, Horton.
Image:  Jackson-Stops & Staff.
The heated limestone floor continues into the Stair Hall and the Dining Hall with French doors opening to the portico, terrace, and gardens.

The Drawing Room at The Temple House, Horton.
Image:  Jackson-Stops & Staff.
Beyond, the Drawing Room has walls with applied mouldings to simulate panelling.

The Kitchen at The Temple House, Horton.
Image:  Jackson-Stops & Staff.
The Kitchen, which also serves as a Breakfast Room, has handmade cabinets with hardwood countertops and a fireplace.  Across the lobby with door to the garden is a Pantry/Utility Room with Carrara marble countertops.  In addtion, there is a small sitting room (not pictured) with hand-blocked Print Room style wallpaper, according to the sales data, this is used as a cinema room.

Upper Stair at The Temple House, Horton.
Image:  Jackson-Stops & Staff.


Bedroom One at The Temple House, Horton.
Image:  Jackson-Stops & Staff.


Bedroom Two at The Temple House, Horton.
Image:  Jackson-Stops & Staff.
A Bathroom at The Temple House, Horton.
Image:  Jackson-Stops & Staff.
Another garden front view of The Temple House.
Image:  Jackson-Stops & Staff.
Like The Menagerie, the design of The Temple House is attributed to the architect-astronomer, Thomas Wright of Durham.  (Note:  at time of publication of this posting of The Devoted Classicist, this property with ID = 50080 is not available).

A view of Temple Court in the distance.
Image:  Jackson-Stops & Staff.

Sunday, February 10, 2013

More on Guigne Court

The prinicpal elevation of Guigne Court.
Image:  Sotheby's International Realty.
Devoted Readers will recall the 2011 essay on The Devoted Classicist about a celebrated estate near San Francisco known as Guigne Court.  It had been decorated by Anthony Hail in the early 1960s in a classic style that has proven to be timeless.

Satellite view of the estate showing location.
Image: Sotheby's International Realty.
The latest news is that the mansion of 16,000 square feet on 47 acres in Hillsborough is for sale.  Listed as the Estate and Lands Deguigne on the Sotheby's International Realty site, the asking price is $100 million.  Of major consideration is that the current owner Christian de Guigne, 4th, age 75, is to maintain occupancy for the rest of his life.

Driveway entrance.
Image:  Sotheby's International Realty.
A driveway of 4,500 feet winds through the picturesque property, allowing a variety of views.  Comparing Sotheby's interior photos with those from about 50 years ago, much of Mr. Hail's decoration has remained.

Entrance Hall as view from the front door.
Image:  Sotheby's International Realty.
Entrance Hall, with a view to the garden.
Image:  Sotheby's International Realty.
Although labelled the Living Room
in an earlier publication, it may be
considered the Ballroom.
Image:  Sotheby's International Realty.
Another view of the same room,
showing the fireplace.
Image:  Sotheby's International Realty.
Unlabelled, it is unclear if this is
considered the Living Room or Library.
Image:  Sotheby's International Realty.
The garden elevation.
Image:  Sotheby's International Realty.
A view down to the swimming pool,
showing the Pavillion to the left.
Image: Sotheby's International Realty.
The steps down from the swimming pool
terrace to the garden.
Image:  Sotheby's International Realty.
The real estate description indicates that there is a "grand-scaled Ballroom,  Living Room, Library and Pavillion" that open to a pool courtyard.  The rooms are not labelled on the website, so a best guess is given for the captions above.  It is a rare opportunity to own such a large estate so close to a major city, so it will be interesting to see how much activity is generated with the price and the life tenancy restriction.
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